Gilbert group and collaborators publish article in Nature Communications

Posted October 3, 2019
Nature Communications Cover

The paper "Vastly Extended Drug Release from Poly(pro-17β-Estradiol) Materials Facilitates in vitro Neurotrophism and Neuroprotection" was published in Nature Communications. The paper is a collaboration between Ryan Gilbert's group in Biomedical Engineering and Ed Palermo's group in Materials Science. The authors are Anthony D'Amato, Devan Puhl, Samuel Ellman, Bailey Balouch, Ryan Gilbert, and Edmund Palermo. The abstract of the paper is shown below: Central nervous system (CNS) injuries persist for years, and currently there are no therapeutics that can address the complex injury cascade that develops over this time-scale. 17β-estradiol (E2) has broad tropism within the CNS, targeting and inducing beneficial phenotypic changes in myriad cells following injury. To address the unmet need for vastly prolonged E2 release, we report first-generation poly(pro-E2) biomaterial scaffolds that release E2 at nanomolar concentrations over the course of 1-10 years via slow hydrolysis in vitro. As a result of their finely tuned properties, these scaffolds demonstrate the ability to promote and guide neurite extension ex vivo and protect neurons from oxidative stress in vitro. The design and testing of these materials reported herein demonstrate the first step towards next-generation implantable biomaterials with prolonged release and excellent regenerative potential. Central nervous system (CNS) injuries persist for years, and currently there are no therapeutics that can address the complex injury cascade that develops over this time-scale. 17β-estradiol (E2) has broad tropism within the CNS, targeting and inducing beneficial phenotypic changes in myriad cells following injury. To address the unmet need for vastly prolonged E2 release, we report first-generation poly(pro-E2) biomaterial scaffolds that release E2 at nanomolar concentrations over the course of 1-10 years via slow hydrolysis in vitro. As a result of their finely tuned properties, these scaffolds demonstrate the ability to promote and guide neurite extension ex vivo and protect neurons from oxidative stress in vitro. The design and testing of these materials reported herein demonstrate the first step towards next-generation implantable biomaterials with prolonged release and excellent regenerative potential. A link to the article is shown below: https://www.nature.com/ncomms/